Week of 11/06/2018

Dear Parents,

Happy Monday! Hope you had a great weekend! Here’s what’s happening this week:

Reading: We are excited to begin our third unit in the Benchmark Advance program. In this unit, your child will read and compare selections about cultivating food in the past and today to understand how we develop our natural resources. They will explore the big business of farming as well as how to grow corn in your own neighborhood. They will] look especially at the history of corn as a food resource in North America, and follow its development into the big industry it is today.  The selections in this unit feature a variety of genres, including informational texts, opinion essays, tall tales, folktales, and editorials. This unit is sure to inspire deeper interest in where our food comes from, and it provides good opportunities for out-of-the-classroom learning.

Math: We are almost towards the end of this module!  This week we will take some time to review previous standards to prepare students for the upcoming Module 2 test.

Recently, we have been working on dividing decimal dividends by multiples of 10, using basic facts to approximate decimal quotients with two-digit divisors, reasoning about the placement of the decimal point and making connections to a written method.  We are finishing this unit by making sure students apply the work of Module 2 to solve multi-step word problems using multi-digit division.  An emphasis on checking the reasonableness of their answers draws on skills learned throughout the module, including refining their knowledge of place value, rounding, and estimation.   Click here for a another great math resource!

Writing: We are currently working on the process of informative writing.  But before students can write proficient fifth grade writing pieces, students need to have a clear understanding of proficiency.  Here’s the success criteria we will be using which will guide students as they write their informative pieces.

Respond to ALL parts of the prompt
Introduce a topic clearly and provide a general observation and focus.
Group related information logically.
Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
Use a variety of transitional words, phrases, and/or clauses
Use precise language and academic vocabulary
Use paragraphs to organize writing
Organize writing that attends to task, purpose, and audience
Use appropriate voice
Use correct punctuation, capitalization, and grammar
Write legibly with correct spacing and margins

Social Studies:  We are currently learning about the 13 colonies and the factors that shaped colonial North America.  A question you may ask your child is:

  • How did conflict/cooperation among different groups of people affect the development of the United States?  

The book, Blood on the River, explores the day-to-day lives of the colonists at James Town, Virginia, as well as themes such as learning how to react to anger and conflict.     A major theme in the novel is presented when the character, Captain Smith says, “Don’t let your anger get the best of you, Samuel. . . . Learn to channel it, and it will become your strength rather than your weakness.”  Discuss with your child, what does Captain Smith mean by this? What can we infer about these characters?

Have a great week, parents!

Any questions, please let us know!

Fifth Grade Team

 

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Posted on 2018-11-05, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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